Shanghai 2114 by Nikolay Razuev

Shanghai 2114 by Nikolay Razuev

dailyscientists:

October 15th is the Ada Lovelace Day, an annual celebration of the achievements of women in science and technology.

Ada Lovelace (10 December 1815 – 27 November 1852), often described as the world’s first computer programmer, showed a keen interest in mathematical studies from an early age and was taught by her mother, Annabella, who was also a gifted mathematician.

In correspondence with Charles Babbage, who was working on the ideas for a machine that is now recognised as a forerunner of the modern computer, Ada demonstrated her gift for mathematics and was described by him as “the enchantress of numbers”.

She was introduced to him by another female scientist famous in her day, the mathematician Mary Somerville, who mentored Ada during her relatively short life.

Babbage was impressed by the mathematical skills Ada possessed and invited her to translate a piece in Italian written by Luigi Menabrea describing Babbage’s ‘analytical engine’, so that it could be published in England.

Her notes include what is recognised as the first algorithm intended to be processed by a machine, while she also speculated on its future ability to create graphics and complex music.

Born in 1815, she had no relationship with her father, who died when she was eight. In 1835, she married William King, who was created Earl of Lovelace in 1838. She died in 1852 at the age of 36.

Her lasting legacy as role model for girls and young women considering careers in technology is remembered on Ada Lovelace Day, which is dedicated to the celebration of the achievements of women in science and technology. (Source: http://www.theguardian.com)

(Source: totallyjack.com)

Yesterday I had an overnight layover in Hong Kong, so I decided to head down to Admiralty and Causeway Bay to check out the Occupy Central protests. The crowds weren’t as sizeable as they’d been earlier in the movement, but it was still really interesting to witness Day 10 firsthand. Though violence has broken out a few times during the movement, I was lucky to see the peaceful side of it: students and activists cheering, singing, recycling, spreading the message and helping each other out. Shoutout to the person who made sure I didn’t slip when coming down a set of makeshift stairs leading to the main avenue where all the protesters were gathered, whoever you are.

Side note: Turns out I was at Admiralty just a few minutes after a bunch of Blue Ribbons tried to gain access to the site

Taiwan: pretty much perfect

thatsmags:

Back the Bid? Beijing’s high hopes of hosting the 2022 Winter Olympics

Last month, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) officially announced Beijing’s bid to host the 2022 Winter Games would move on to the candidate phase. If successful, the Chinese capital would make history as the first city to hold both the Summer and Winter Games. We decided to pay a visit to one of the proposed sites, the small Heibei county of Chongli, a small Hebei county under the administration of Zhangjiakou City with a population of just 125,000.

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(Source: popsonnet)

lol, remember that one time I uploaded video of a dancing toddler to Youtube on a whim and suddenly it had 1.3 million views?

lol, remember that one time I uploaded video of a dancing toddler to Youtube on a whim and suddenly it had 1.3 million views?

thatsmags:

Behold, the first laowai! 1,400 year old skull thought to be the first ever European to visit China
The remains of a human skill, originally uncovered by intrepid Chinese scientists in Guyuan, a small city in Ningxia, Southwest China, may in fact be of European origin. 

thatsmags:

Behold, the first laowai! 1,400 year old skull thought to be the first ever European to visit China

The remains of a human skill, originally uncovered by intrepid Chinese scientists in Guyuan, a small city in Ningxia, Southwest China, may in fact be of European origin. 

(Source: waavedada)